Rebecca Terrell
Rebecca Terrell
February 6, 2018
Tele Talks: Everything but Football

There is no greater arena than then the Super Bowl.... and we're not just talking about the game. From the half-time show to the #SuperBowlKid, our team always has a lot to say! We weighed in on the action and put in our vote for the best, the worst and the most creative Super Bowl ads of the year. Which ones came out on top? Read on to find out!

 

 

This commercial is hilarious! We all ask Alexa questions just to hear her response a lot of the time. Imagine if Alexa was a real person! That’s exactly what this commercial did with Alexa losing her voice. The voice assistant is then replaced by celebrities who give funny responses. My personal favorite is Rebel Wilson. It was fun that Amazon CEO, Jeff Bezos, is included as well. Props to Amazon! I laughed out loud several times. - Laura Wright, Project Manager

 

 

Tide really nailed it this year. They not only made fun of every typical Super Bowl ad but they incorporated their own brand into the ad. Tide made it seem like you were watching a commercial about one thing or product and then they said nope it’s a Tide ad. I also like the fact that in one of the ads they put two Tide commercials inside 15 seconds (7-8 seconds each). I believe this use of two commercials inside 15 seconds will become more of the norm for most big brands. People’s attention spans for content are becoming less and less.  Very well done Tide. - Seth Baird, Videographer

I know I watched many commercials, but the only ones I remember are the Tide ads. I thought I saw an Old Spice commercial, but it was a Tide ad. I also thought I saw a Mr. Clean commercial, but then it turned out to be a Tide ad as well. - Brandon Green, Director of Brand Acquisition 

 

 

I loved how Tide ran “fake” ads mocking many of the typical-type commercials we’re used to seeing. It’s hard to surprise people through advertising but Tide did it beautifully. When the guy from Old Spice appeared on my screen I thought “oh here we go again” but nope, turns out they pulled a Sprint and scooped up the face of another brand to take over theirs. Absolute genius. Intermittent ads all throughout the game were worth the price as the Tide rolled to the top of my list. -David Hildebrand, Associate Creative Director 

 

 

I LOVED the Eli Manning and Odell Beckham, Jr. “Dirty Dancing” commercial. Obviously, my first thought was that it was hilarious. However, it was so great to see them bring fun back to the NFL. Let’s be honest, the NFL hasn’t had the best season with a lot of players being injured as well as many political divisiveness over some players refusing to stand for the national anthem. Many people have been afraid to talk about the NFL out of fear that it would bring up a political debate. With the Dirty Dancing commercial, the players became fun, likable and approachable once again. The giants brought everyone back to a great Hollywood past time and let me tell you …. they nailed it! - Erin Mosher, Art Director

 

 

As a Creative Director, and someone who has sat in countless project kickoffs with clients over the years, I can’t help but view an ad through the lens of what the creative brief must have been. It seems like most Super Bowl ads today just compete for attention with the only goal being to generate as much discussion as possible. Very few seem to have much selling strategy behind them. Pringles, however, had a very obvious cross-selling strategy baked into their “stack flavors, make new ones” ad. The goal: get consumers to buy more than one can at a time. And as a bonus, you might even get people to go through your product twice as fast. It reminded me a lot of the brilliant old marketing strategy shampoo companies came up with many years ago when they added the phrase “Lather, Rinse, Repeat” to the bottle. Why lather and rinse once, when you can do it twice and use double the shampoo? Well done Pringles, I’m off to buy twice as much of your product now. - Seth Griffin, Creative Director 

 

Which Super Bowl commercial was your favorite? Least favorite? 
Continue the conversation with #TeleTalks on Twitter.